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    The Benefits of Talking to Yourself

    The New York Times

    The fairly common habit of talking aloud to yourself is what psychologists call external self-talk. And although self-talk is sometimes looked at as just an eccentric quirk, research has found that it can influence behavior and cognition.

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    Pain, Heat, and Emotion with Functional MRI

    New England Journal of Medicine

    The studies conducted by Wager and colleagues serve as an example of how functional neuroimaging may help clinicians assess clinical symptoms, such as somatic and emotional pain, that were previously thought to be impenetrable.

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    Introspective or Narcissistic?

    The New York Times

    Psychologists and others have given some thought to this question. The upshot of their work is that there seems to be a paradox at the heart of introspection. The self is something that can be seen more accurately from a distance than from close up. The more you can yank yourself away from your own intimacy with yourself, the more reliable your self-awareness is likely to be.

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    Is Facebook Luring You Into Being Depressed?

    Nautilus

    In many ways, social networking sites are giant experiments on one of our species’ most essential characteristics: our social nature. So it shouldn’t be a surprise there are unintended consequences. “No one constructed something to make people feel bad or good,” says Ethan Kross, a social psychologist at the University of Michigan. “But, what we’re looking at is, how does it actually play out and impact people in daily life?”

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    ‘Self Talk’: When Talking to Yourself, the Way You Do It Makes a Difference

    The Wall Street Journal

    Researchers say talking to yourself, out loud, is more common than many of us might care to admit. Psychologists call it “self talk” and say how we do it makes a big difference in both our mood and how we think about ourselves.

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    The Voice of Reason

    Psychology Today

    Everyone engages in self-talk. But much depends on the way we do it. Scientists now find that the right words can free us from our fears and make us as wise about ourselves as we often are about others.

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    On Instagram, the Summer You’re Not Having

    The New York Times

    A recent study measured the emotional effects of Facebook use, finding that passively using the platform (scrolling through your feed and looking at people’s posts the way you would on Instagram) enhances envy, which in turn makes people feel worse over all.

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    Pronouns Matter When Psyching Yourself Up

    Harvard Business Review

    Some people seem to have an amazing ability to stay rational no matter what. They efficiently make good, clear decisions while the rest of us waste energy doing things like panicking about upcoming tasks, ruminating pointlessly, or refusing to move on from our failures. What makes these people so different and can we be more like them?

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    Is the World More Depressed?

    The New York Times

    We have recently learned that Facebook leads people to feel less good in the moment and less satisfied with their lives. The authors of a University of Michigan study speculate that what drives that outcome is social comparison. Other people post flattering photographs and funny comments while your own life just feels so dull.

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    The ‘How Are You?’ Culture Clash

    The New York Times

    Psychologists at the University of Michigan have shown that, while Russians are, indeed, more prone to brooding than Americans, their open embrace of negative experiences might ultimately be healthier, resulting in fewer symptoms of depression.

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    How Facebook Makes Us Unhappy

    The New Yorker

    No one joins Facebook to be sad and lonely. But a new study from the University of Michigan psychologist Ethan Kross argues that that’s exactly how it makes us feel. Kross found that the more people used Facebook, the less happy they felt.

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    Facebook Is Bad For You: Get a Life!

    The Economist

    A study just published by the Public Library of Science, conducted by Ethan Kross of the University of Michigan and Philippe Verduyn of Leuven University in Belgium, has shown that the more someone uses Facebook, the less satisfied he is with life

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    ScienceShot: Facebook is Making you Sad

    Science

    Did you spend some time on Facebook today? If so, it probably made you just a little bit sadder. That’s the troubling conclusion of a study of Facebook use and well-being, published today in PLOS ONE. The result is counterintuitive, because abundant psychological research finds that contact with friends and family is crucial for well-being.

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    Rejection May Hurt More than Feelings

    The New York Times

    Nobody would deny that being ostracized on the playground, mocked in a sales meeting or broken up with over Twitter feels bad. But the sting of social rejection may be more like the ouch! of physical pain than previously understood.

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